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Sligo University Hospital

Sligo University Hospital provides high-quality healthcare to the people of Sligo, Leitrim, South Donegal and West Cavan.

SUH provides Acute Inpatient, Outpatient, and Day Services as well as Regional Specialty Services in Ophthalmology and Ear, Nose and Throat Services.

SUH has a Medical Academy with NUI Galway which includes clinical rotations/ education for medical students from NUI Galway on Sligo University Hospital Campus.

Main Phone Number: +353 (0)71 917 1111

 

Click here for information on our antenatal classes

Sligo University Hospital providing skin cancer advice at the Ploughing Championships

Experts from the Dermatology Department at Sligo University Hospital will be at the HSE Stand at the National Ploughing Championships from 18 to 20 September to offer skin cancer information to visitors.

Sligo University Hospital’s Endoscopy Department achieves JAG Accreditation

Last month, following completion of an in-depth accreditation checklist and site assessment, the Endoscopy Department at Sligo University Hospital was successfully awarded accreditation through the UK based accreditation programme for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy known as the Joint Advisory Group or JAG.

The JAG accreditation is regarded as one of the most innovative in the healthcare sector and focuses on a model of care which is patient-centred and work force based.

Sligo University Hospital - Big Switch Off

Over the August bank holiday weekend, Sligo University Hospital took part in the “Big Switch Off” organised by the Office of Public Works and the HSE’s National Health and Sustainability Office. The aim was to conserve as much electrical and thermal energy as possible across the campus over the weekend and the efforts will be repeated over the October bank holiday weekend.

Green Campus information and health screening day at Sligo University Hospital

To celebrate European Sustainability Energy day and European Obesity Day, Sligo University Hospital hosted a ‘Green Campus’ health screening day for staff, patients and service users in its main foyer on 16 May.

Step challenge 2018 at Sligo University Hospital

Sligo University hospital registered for the Smarter Travel Step to Health challenge which commenced on 23rd of April and concluded 27th of May 2018. The steps to health challenge was a 5 week step challenge which required participants to record their daily step counts using a pedometer. Participants were given a pedometer and record card to enable them to record their daily step counts. Participants were required to record their daily step counts 7 days a week for 5 weeks.

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Saolta University Health Care Group (formally West/North West Hospitals Group) is one of six new hospital groups announced by the Minister for Health, Dr. James Reilly TD in May, 2013, as part of a re-organisation of public hospitals into more efficient and accountable hospital groups that will deliver improved outcomes for patients.

 
 
The Group's Academic Partner is NUI Galway.
 
By working in groups, hospital services will be provided by the hospitals in each group based on the evidence-based needs of their populations. Each group of hospitals will work together as single cohesive entities managed as one, to provide acute care for patients in their area, integrating with community and primary care. This will maximise the amount of care delivered locally, whilst ensuring complex care is safely provided in larger hospitals.
 
The objectives of the groups are to:
  • Achieve the highest standard of quality and uniformity in hospital care across the group;
  • Deliver cost effective hospital care in a timely and sustainable manner;
  • Encourage and support clinical and managerial leaders;
  • Ensure high standards of governance, both clinical and corporate and recruit and retain high quality nurses, NCHDs, consultants, allied health professionals and administrators in all our hospitals.
 
Saolta University Health Care Group has 1,770 beds and 7,620 staff and a budget of €600m.
 
OUR MISSION STATEMENT

Patients are at the heart of everything we do.  Our mission is to provide high quality and equitable services for all by delivering care based on excellence in clinical practice, teaching, and research, grounded in kindness, compassion and respect, whilst developing our staff and becoming a model employer.

 

OUR VISION STATEMENT

Our Vision is to build on excellent foundations already laid, further developing and integrating our Group, fulfilling our role as an exemplar, and becoming the first Trust in Ireland.

 

OUR GUIDING VALUES

Respect - We aim to be an organisation where privacy, dignity, and individual needs are respected, where staff are valued, supported and involved in decision–making, and where diversity is celebrated, recognising that working in a respectful environment will enable us to achieve more.

Compassion    We will treat all patients and family members with dignity, sensitivity and empathy.

Kindness  -  Whilst we develop our organisation as a business, we will remember it is a service, and treat our patients and each other with kindness and humanity.

Quality  -  We seek continuous quality improvement in all we do, through creativity, innovation, education and research.

Learning  -   We will nurture and encourage lifelong learning and continuous improvement, attracting, developing and retaining high quality staff, enabling them to fulfill their  potential.

Integrity  -  through our governance arrangements and or value system, we will ensure all of our services are transparent, trustworthy and reliable and delivered to the highest ethical standards, taking responsibility and accountability for our actions.

Teamworking  -  we will engage and empower our staff, sharing best practise and strengthening relationships with our partners and patients to achieve our Mission.

Communication  -  we aim to communicate with patients, the public, our staff and stakeholders, empowering them to actively participate in all aspects of the service, encouraging inclusiveness, openness and accountability.

 

These Values shape our strategy to create an organisational culture and ethos to deliver high quality and safe services for all we serve and that staff are rightly proud of.

Sligo University Hospital Map

sligo university hospital sligo

Information for Open Water Swimmers, Surfers, Kayakers and all Cold Water Athletes

What is Surfer’s Ear?

Well for starters, it’s not just for surfers. In fact, all cold water athletes are at risk of developing the condition. Surfer’s Ear is a medical condition clinically known as External Auditory Canal Exostoses (EACE) or Exostoses, which is caused by repeated exposure to cold water and wind.

Exostoses are formed in response to a continuous change of temperature within the ear canal. As cold water regularly swirls along the ear canal, the body responds by warming the affected area, this also stimulates bone-producing cells within the ear canal, which cause the bone surrounding the ear to develop a bony growth.

These benign bone growths can lead to infections, water trapping, hearing loss and complete closure of the ear canal if left untreated

The condition develops slowly over time and it may take 10 to 15 years for the symptoms to appear.

Cause?

Research shows that Surfer’s Ear is most likely in exposure to cold water below 19deg. In Ireland, the water is usually at its warmest in August and even then the average temperature ranges from 13 to 17 degrees. The bottom line is – the water in Ireland is always too cold for our ears!

Surfer's Ear Clinic

Doctors from Sligo University Hospital held a Surfer’s Ear clinic to raise awareness of the condition.

 

 
What does Surfer’s Ear look like?

                                                                             

How do you protect your ears?

Wear earplugs.

The advice couldn’t be simpler; this truly is a practical and cost-effective way to reduce your risk of developing exostoses. Hearing loss associated with wearing earplugs was identified through our study as the main deterrent for athletes across all sporting disciplines. However, modern earplugs are not only discrete but also let sound in and keep water out.

What to do if you are worried?

Visit your GP and ask him/her to check your ears. Your GP may then refer you to your nearest hospital to see a specialist Ear Nose and Throat doctor to examine your ears further.

Research at Sligo University Hospital

A team of consultants, doctors and staff from the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) department conducted a year-long project to examine Irish cold water athlete’s awareness and understanding of exostoses as well as athlete’s attitudes towards preventative measures such as wearing earplugs.

The ENT team held five “Surfer’s Ear Clinics” which examined almost 100 cold water athletes, concluding that 1 in 2 athletes had Surfer’s Ear.

Questionnaire
Calling all triathletes, surfers, open water swimmers, sub aqua and non-water athletes –  help us with our research 'To Determine Water Athletes Awareness of Surfers Ear or Exostosis and Attitudes to wearing Ear Plugs', click here