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Hospitals at Saolta University Health Care Group

Sligo University Hospital looking for volunteers to lead the way

Sligo University Hospital looking for volunteers to lead the way

Sligo University Hospital is calling for people who are interested in becoming Meet and Greet Volunteers in the hospital. Volunteers provide assistance to patients and visitors to Sligo University Hospital, their role is to help with directions, answer general enquiries and in essence, be a ‘go to’ information point at the hospital.

Healing Through Arts

Healing Through Arts

Sligo IT pilot first MEDEX programme outside of DCU

Sligo University Hospital and Sligo IT pilot first MEDEX programme outside of DCU

Physiotherapy Department at Sligo University Hospital  in collaboration with Sligo IT pilot first MedEx programme outside of Dublin City University since its establishment in 2006. MedEx is a novel, community-based rehabilitation and exercise programme for people with a chronic illness or disease.  

Values in Action Sligo

Very enjoyable morning at Sligo Values in Action get together yesterday.

Great atmosphere and engagment, looking forward to spreading the behaviours in Sligo

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The Saolta University Health Care Group provides acute and specialist hospital services to the West and North West of Ireland – counties Galway, Mayo, Roscommon, Sligo, Leitrim, Donegal and adjoining counties.

The Group's Academic Partner is NUI Galway.
 

Vision
Our vision is to be a leading academic Hospital Group providing excellent integrated patient-centred care delivered by skilled caring staff.

Saolta Guiding Principles

Care - Compassion - Trust - Learning

Our guiding principles are to work in partnership with patients and other healthcare providers across the continuum of care to:

  • Deliver high quality, safe, timely and equitable patient care by developing and ensuring sustainable clinical services to meet the needs of our population.
  • Deliver integrated services across the Saolta Group Hospitals, with clear lines of responsibility, accountability and authority, whilst maintaining individual hospital site integrity.
  • Continue to develop and improve our clinical services supported by education, research and innovation, in partnership with NUI Galway and other academic partners.
  • Recruit, retain and develop highly-skilled multidisciplinary teams through support, engagement and empowerment.
Saolta Strategy 2019-2023

We have developed a five year strategy which outlines the vision and framework for the Group’s strategic development from 2019 to 2023.

We are committed to ensuring that our patients are at the centre of all service design, development and delivery. Over the five years of the strategy we will further develop our services, both clinical and organisational based around seven key themes: Quality and Patient Safety; Patient Access; Governance and Integration; Skilled Caring Staff; Education Research and Innovation; eHealth and Infrastructure. These will be our key areas of focus to enable us to meet the future needs of our patients.

We have identified 20 priority projects across the Group which are aligned with Sláintecare’s goals. They include a number of clinical and organisational projects which are focused on further improving services for our patients and staff. We will continue to work very closely with our colleagues in the community both Community Healthcare West and Community Health Organisation 1 in the North West to deliver more streamlined care to our patients in line with the national focus of bringing services closer to patients.

A key theme within this strategy and its successful implementation is the development of Managed Clinical and Academic Networks. While the tertiary referral centre for the Group is University Hospital Galway, it is essential that all our hospitals work more closely together in delivering services to address the challenges facing us across our region. These networks will ensure that specialities in individual hospitals will no longer work in isolation but as a networked team which will improve clinical quality and patient safety. It will also support collective learning/sharing of expertise and will be supported by education, training, research and audit programmes. It will result in safer, standardised and more sustainable services for our patients and improved recruitment and retention of staff.

To read the full strategy, click here.

 

Sligo University Hospital Map

sligo university hospital sligo

Information for Open Water Swimmers, Surfers, Kayakers and all Cold Water Athletes

What is Surfer’s Ear?

Well for starters, it’s not just for surfers. In fact, all cold water athletes are at risk of developing the condition. Surfer’s Ear is a medical condition clinically known as External Auditory Canal Exostoses (EACE) or Exostoses, which is caused by repeated exposure to cold water and wind.

Exostoses are formed in response to a continuous change of temperature within the ear canal. As cold water regularly swirls along the ear canal, the body responds by warming the affected area, this also stimulates bone-producing cells within the ear canal, which cause the bone surrounding the ear to develop a bony growth.

These benign bone growths can lead to infections, water trapping, hearing loss and complete closure of the ear canal if left untreated

The condition develops slowly over time and it may take 10 to 15 years for the symptoms to appear.

Cause?

Research shows that Surfer’s Ear is most likely in exposure to cold water below 19deg. In Ireland, the water is usually at its warmest in August and even then the average temperature ranges from 13 to 17 degrees. The bottom line is – the water in Ireland is always too cold for our ears!

Surfer's Ear Clinic

Doctors from Sligo University Hospital held a Surfer’s Ear clinic to raise awareness of the condition.         

 

 
What does Surfer’s Ear look like?

                                                                             

How do you protect your ears?

Wear earplugs.

The advice couldn’t be simpler; this truly is a practical and cost-effective way to reduce your risk of developing exostoses. Hearing loss associated with wearing earplugs was identified through our study as the main deterrent for athletes across all sporting disciplines. However, modern earplugs are not only discrete but also let sound in and keep water out.

What to do if you are worried?

Visit your GP and ask him/her to check your ears. Your GP may then refer you to your nearest hospital to see a specialist Ear Nose and Throat doctor to examine your ears further.

Research at Sligo University Hospital

A team of consultants, doctors and staff from the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) department conducted a year-long project to examine Irish cold water athlete’s awareness and understanding of exostoses as well as athlete’s attitudes towards preventative measures such as wearing earplugs.

The ENT team held five “Surfer’s Ear Clinics” which examined almost 100 cold water athletes, concluding that 1 in 2 athletes had Surfer’s Ear.

The Irish Institute of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery provided Dr Seamus Boyle, ENT SpR at the hospital, with financial support in the form of a small grant to progress this research. The Institute plans to work with him to expand this project, as outlined by Professor Nash Patil in the video below:

                                                                                     

Questionnaire
Calling all triathletes, surfers, open water swimmers, sub aqua and non-water athletes –  help us with our research 'To Determine Water Athletes Awareness of Surfers Ear or Exostosis and Attitudes to wearing Ear Plugs', click here

 

Click here to view guide